This Magnificent Madness
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This Magnificent Madness

A retired Roman centurion reacts negatively to the events of Paul’s first visit to Philippi but eventually has a change of heart.

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This Magnificent Madness

A retired Roman centurion reacts negatively to the events of Paul’s first visit to Philippi but eventually acknowledges his search for truth has persuaded him to become a Christian.


Author:    Fredrick Saur

Synopsis:

Anthony, a retired Roman centurion, reacts negatively to the events of Paul’s first visit to Philippi and the growth of Christianity in the city. Over the years, a series of events, miracles, and earthquakes cause Anthony to slowly and reluctantly acknowledge the value of a Christian ideology, but he resists making a personal commitment to such non-Roman dogma. Finally, as his family and community quarrel about church government and doctrine, he acknowledges that he needs to publicly acknowledge his “new religion” and reluctantly takes a position of leadership in the Christian community.

This Magnificent Madness

This Magnificent Madness

or

A T  P H I L I P P I

(Loosely based on the books of Acts, Luke, and Philippians)

by 

Frederick L. Saur

 

 

This Magnificent Madness

 Copyright   

by Frederick L. Saur

All Rights Reserved

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ACT I, scene i

Anthony, a retired Roman centurion, reacts negatively to the events of Paul’s first visit to Philippi and the growth of Christianity.  The boys Marcus, son of Lydia, and Ditus (Epaphroditus), son of Anthony, plot to, and eventually pour water from the rooftop onto pedestrians.  Both Rufio, Anthony’s comrade-in-arms, and Lydia, his neighbor, are upset by the arrest of Paul and his casting out of the spirit from the slave girl.  Rufio has brought a gift of model ships for the boys, which later gets them into trouble.  Rufio does not understand why Anthony studies many foreign philosophies. Scene ii

Pothinus, an Egyptian merchant, discusses Christianity with Lydia.  When an earthquake shakes the buildings, Anthony cynically questions if the earthquake is a sign from the new Christian god.

Scene iii

After the earthquake, Anthony cannot sleep because he is troubled by Paul’s message which contradicts some of the writings he has studied.  Anthony is endeavoring to find peace of mind, now that he is retired.

Scene iv

Anthony instructs his new steward, Kalchus, to accompany the boys to the circus to watch Stylus, his former steward, a thief, fight for his life.  Anthony discusses his study of philosophers with Pothinus.  Rufio brings news that Paul is freed from prison.  Rufio also returns a corona to Anthony stolen by Stylus.  Rufio is upset when his wife Syntyche contributes dormice for the Christian love feast.  Ditus angrily confronts his father about the death of Stylus.  Frustrated by his son’s reaction, Anthony throws the corona, symbol of his career as a centurion, to the floor.  Anthony explains his cynicism about religion to Pothinus.  Pothinus buys from Rufio the slave girl whom Paul has freed from prophesy.  Ditus and Marcus play a game of war and Marcus is injured when he falls from the rooftop.

Act II, scene i

The next day, Syntyche comes to Euodia with pagan charms to cure the ill Marcus.  Rufio conspires with Kalchus to cheat Anthony by falsifying accounts.  Anthony refuses to join Pothinus and the Christians as they pray for Marcus, but Anthony does study what writings about Jesus are being circulated.  Anthony is impressed as he watches his son pray for his playmate, who then recovers.

Scene i i

Eight years later, Rufio and Kalchus, now a free man, discuss how Anthony has become a compassionate slave owner, though he refuses to become a Christian.  Lydia and Euodia await news about their sons who are in Rome with Paul: Ditus is ill and Marcus has disappeared.  Lydia attempts to mediate the quarrel between Euodia and Syntyche about the celebration of Holy Communion.  Anthony is furious to learn that Kalchus has falsified accounts and instructs Kalchus to correct the accounts before he is punished.  Ditus, now a man and called Epaphroditus, returns safely and in good health from Rome with the letter called Philippians.

Scene iii

Later that day, Lydia reads Paul’s letter (Philippians) to Euodia and Syntyche and persuades them to resolve their differences.  Rufio invites Pothinus to meet with Kalchus, who is altering accounts to win favor with Anthony’s debtors.  Pothinus refuses to alter his debts.  Iras tells Lydia they have been unable to find the runaway Marcus.  Fearing for his life, Kalchus requests Ditus intercede,  Anthony demonstrates his Christianity by dismissing Kalchus without punishment and agrees to state publicly his belief in the divinity of Christ and to be baptized.


CHARACTERS

(4 MEN, 5 WOMEN, 2 BOYS – AGE TWELVE)

Anthony is over fif5ty years of age with the bearing of a soldier.  His piercing eyes are shadowed by a brooding, furrowed forehead.  Used to commanding and being instantly obeyed, he is a vain man, refusing to acknowledge that time and the injuries of war require that he temper his activities, and he endeavors to disguise his limp and the stiffness of his joints when he rises from a chair and walks.

Euodia (Euo’di.a), is younger than Anthony, pretty, kind, an aristocratic Roman matron who runs her household with authority, but always accedes to her husband’s wishes.

Lydia is a brisk, middle-aged business woman, very attractive, with a strong personality.

Rufio is barrel-chested, retired comrade in arms to Anthony, as eager to please his friend as he is to earn money and position in the community of Philippi.  He has the charm of the country politician but lacks the polished guile.  In the years between Acts I and II, he and his wife gain at least 20 pounds, enough to show self-indulgence but not to encourage laughter.

SYNTYCHE (Syn’ty.che), Rufio’s wife, is vain, pretty, plump, eager to be a leader in the community even if others must take a lower place at the banquet table.

Pothinus is of middle age, large, with the grace of movement of a champion athlete. His dark skin and beard are complemented by his colorful clothing and jewels which he wears not in vanity but to impress his customers and fellow merchants.  In contradiction to his intimidating physical presence, he displays a warm, gentle, winning personality. He is best played by a black actor with a bass voice.

Ditus (EPAPHRODITUS the man in Act III [Ep.aph.ro.di’tus]) is as tall as his father Anthony, with the noble bearing of his father without but his arrogance and vanity.

Fria is young, pretty, curious, and coquettish.

Kalchus.  Beneath his subservience is a strong, willful personality.  He is in his early twenties and should not be taller than Anthony.

Ditus (Epaphorditus the boy in Acts I and II) may be taller than Marcus with a lighter complexion.

Marcus should be darker, since his mother Lydia is from the near east.  The boys’ personalities are revealed through their conversations and actions.  They are friends and rivals, twelve years of age.

IRAS, the slave with “a spirit of divination,’ is young, black, with a contralto voice and exotic in voice, movement, and dress.


COSTUMES

Should be kept simple; togas on the men unless you permit hairy legs to be shown.  Traditional Roman gowns on the women. The boys wear short gowns, unless they appear in togas, with a purple stripe along the edge.  Some costumes are described within the text.


SETTING

One setting: the flat, open roofs of two dwellings, with exits right rear and left.  The roof stage left (Lydia’s) is a storage area, with an assortment of burlap bundles and baskets and a knee-high table left center with two stools behind it.  A screen or drape to separate a small area from view by the audience is used in several scenes.  The roof-top right (Anthony’s has a shelf near the right exit which holds an assortment of scrolls, writing materials, cups and bowls.  A canvas canopy may extend out from the wall to protect the shelf from the weather.  A writing table with two stools is right center.  The only demands and complications in the setting are

1. The illusion of roof-top height may be created rear center by filling the area to suggest the tops of tress fronted by a knee-high wall

2. Two knee=high parapets should separate the roofs and create a narrow alley between.  These walls may run diagonally across the stage from behind the right rear exit to left front, or down the middle of the stage off-center left, OR ON A SMALL STAGE, position all action concerned with the alley at rear center, with the alley running across the rear of the stage with a knee high wall separating the two roof-tops.  Do keep the setting simple and sparse.

The earthquake must be created as a physical understatement, with very little motion – a slight movement of glass on the tables and a basket falling form the wall or a pile of baskets rolling across the floor.


AT PHILIPPI

Scene I

AS THE CURTAIN OPENS, THE MELODY HEARD AT THE CONCLUSION OF ACT II IS HEARD.  IN THE VERY DIM LIGHT, ANTHONY IS SLOWLY PACING RIGHT TO LEFT.  HE PAUSES TO UNROLL A SCROLL, STUDIES IT, THEN TOSSES IT BACK ONTO THE TABLE AND RESUMES PACING, REACHING STAGE RIGHT AS EUODIA, CARRYING A SMALL LAMP, ENTERS FROM RIGHT AND MOVES TO CENTER.

EUODIA:  Anthony!  Another sleepless night?  Or did you have one of your hateful dreams?

ANTHONY:  Go back to bed.  I will join you soon.

EUODIA:  I cannot rest when you are awake.  Whatever troubles you must trouble me.

ANTHONY:  (Sharply) Go to your bed.

EUODIA:  How have I angered you?

ANTHONY:  You know your place.  I would be alone.  (EUODIA MOVES TO EXIT RIGHT.  REGRETTING HIS SHARPNESS)  Stay.  You are my wife; come share my thoughts.  (SHE SITS LEFT OF THE TABLE. HE PACES THE WIDTH OF THE STAGE ONCE, PAUSES AT TABLE TO LIFT A SCROLL AND THEN DROP IT TO THE TABLE, THEN WALKS RIGHT TO FACE FRONT) I have been troubled by this stranger Paul and his philosophy.  This new belief is much too kind and loving for my world.

EUODIA:  You have said you are not satisfied with petty politics that weaken Rome and foolish men who worship many gods.

ANTHONY:  (NODS IN AGREEMENT AND SMILES BITTERLY) Such words are treasonous from a Roman’s lips.

EUODIA:  Your words will go no further.  Only your wife has heard them.  Anthony, your rest is more important than philosophies.  The city of Philippi lies before you; its rulers are asleep.  Come, rest with them.

ANTHONY:  Are good Romans and all their gods asleep?  Are there any men out there who question as I do?  And if there are such men, how can they sleep?

EUODIA:  Tomorrow at the river we will ask.

ANTHONY:  (TURNS TO FACE HER) The river is a woman’s meeting place.

EUODIA: Other men come and listen.  Clement comes; he questions Paul and finds his answers wise.

ANTHONY:  Paul is clever to speak of a god who cares, who loves mankind; quite opposite to other gods, who do not care for men but, selfish, demand gold and blood.

EUODIA:  Then you will join us once again and learn?

ANTHONY:  Paul is a Jew, a well-known Pharisee.

EUODIA:  His god is new too and good to us; his words bring light into our troubled Philippi.

ANTHONY:  (CROSSES TO TABLE AND PICKS UP SCROLL.  BRUSQUELY) This is woman’s talk.  Get you to bed.  I wish to be alone.  Leave the lamp.

EUODIA:  (GENTLY) When you have a need, please send for me. (She exits.)

ANTHONY:  I should not speak so sharply, but a woman must know her place even if she is good.  Why am I troubled now?  Why, at this time when I have lived longer, richer than most, can I not rest in body and in mind?  Why cannot I be content with what I’ve done; wear my awards and find comfort when men greet me with respect? Why cannot I enjoy a loving wife and growing son? (UNROLLS SCROLL AND READS)  Oh, Epicurus, I thought you correct when you wrote: “The wise man neither seeks escape from living nor fears to cease his life; for neither does life annoy nor does his death seem to be anything evil.  For it is not the larger share, but the pleasant time that is most delicious.”  The pleasant time!  (ROLLS SCROLL UP, PLACES IT ON THE TABLE, MOVES DOWN STAGE TO REGARD THE CITY BENEATH HIM)  So, Philippi, now I am old, shall I find peace of mind as I gather more wealth; shall I be satisfied with status and expect nothing beyond the grave?  Is that enough?  Or is dissatisfaction all that’s left?  

(A QUICK BLACKOUT IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWED BY Scene ii.) 

SCENE 2

TWO BOYS ENTER STAGE LEFT.  DITUS (EPAPHRODITUS) CARRIES A PITCHER OF WATER, FOLLOWED BY MARCUS.  THEY GIGGLE AS THEY ENTER, CHECK TO SEE IF THEY’RE ALONE, AND THEN CROSS TO PEER OVER THE WALL INTO THE ALLEY BELOW.

MARCUS:  Ditus, let me.  It’s my roof.

DITUS: We agreed that if someone complains and I’m the one who doused him from your roof, then you can say you aren’t to blame.  And the same for me if you douse them from across the way.  

(EUODIA ENTERS FOLLOWED BY KALCHUS.  THEY STAND, WATCHING)

MARCUS:  All right.  But pick a fat man, not a beggar.

DITUS:  Why not a beggar?

MARCUS:  They’re dirty anyway and don’t care if their old clothing gets wet.

DITUS:  I’ll pick a fat matron.  (THE TWO BOYS LEAN OVER THE WALL, SILENTLY NUDGING EACH OTHER AS THEY EXAMINE THE PASSERS BY.  ANTHONY ENTERS SILENTLY AND STANDS, UNSEEN BY HIS WIFE AND THE BOYS.  WHEN KALCHUS SEES ANTHONY, HE KNEELS BUT ANTHONY FROWNS AND GESTURES FOR HIM TO STAND UPRIGHT.)  Here comes one.

EUODIA:  Ditus and Brutus!  No more of these pranks.  You will bring trouble to Lydia and her house.

DITUS:  Mother, it’s just clean water.

MARCUS:  Better than a chamber pot!

DITUS:  We both were fouled on our way to gymnasium when Rufio’s servant emptied pots on us.

EUODIA:  Son, I’m sure she meant no harm but did not look and that’s no reason for you to do the same.

ANTHONY:  (LAUGHING) Water’s not the same as a chamber pot.  Boys, find mischief elsewhere.  Lydia’s roof is not the place for play.  Nor is my rooftop.  Son, come here and meet my new steward.

(PICKING UP A PLANK FROM AGAINST THE WALL, THE BOYS QUICKLY MOVE TO PLACE THE PLANK FROM MARCUS’ ROOF TO ANTONY’S, PLANNING TO CROSS FROM ONE ROOF TO THE OTHER BY MEANS OF THE PLANK.)

EUODIA:  Not that way.  You’ll fall!

(RELUCTANTLY, THE BOYS RETURN THE PLANK TO THE WALL.  DITUS WALKS TO THE BALUSTRADE, PICKS UP THE PITCHER, LOOKS FROM HIS FROWNING MOTHER TO HIS SMILING FATHER AND DEFIANTLY POURS THE WATER ON A PEDESTRIAN BELOW.  INDIGNANT CRIES RISE FROM THE ALLEY.  DITUS DROPS THE PITCHER ON THE ROOF AND THE BOYS JUMP OVER THE BROKEN POTTERY AND DISAPPEAR INTO THE BOWELS OF THE HOUSE.)

EUODIA:  Ditus!  ( AND TURNS TO APPEAL TO ANTHONY) Anthony!

ANTHONY:  Euodia, it was only water.  I’ve told our son to take to the wall when walking down the street and he won’t be doused with someone’s muck.

EUODIA:  I’d best go down and see if harm was done.

(SHE  EXITS.  ANTHONY MOVES TO THE TABLE AND EXAMINES A SCROLL WITHOUT LOOKING AT THE YOUNG MAN WHO HAS NOT MOVED FROM HIS POSITION AT THE REAR OF THE ROOM)

ANTHONY: Your name is Kalchus, newly come from Rome.

KALCHUS:  (FACE EXPRESSIONLESS, STEPS FORWARD AND KNEELS) Yes, senator.

ANTHONY:  Once senator.  Now retired.  I’m now a landowner.  I don’t expect my slaves to kneel to me but I will have obedience.  That was my son who poured water from the pitcher.  He obeys his father or he’s punished, but by me alone.  When he’s of age, if you attend and serve us well, he will be your master.   (IMPATIENTLY MOTIONS FOR KALCHUS TO STAND)  How long were you the slave of Marcellus?

KALCHUS:  Ten years.  As his chief steward half that time.

ANTHONY:  Marcellus was my friend.  We fought in Gaul.  He saved my life in battle, but I could not save him from the politics of Rome.

KALCHUS:  Then he is dead?

ANTHONY:  No, exiled. He’s fortunate as are you.  He sent you here to save you from the Roman galleys.  Rowers are lucky if they live two years.

KALCHUS:  I have good fortune to be sold to you.  My master praised you for your skills in farming and in trade as well as war.  He said if I took care I could earn freedom because you respected life.

ANTHONY:  (LOOKS SHARPLY AT HIS SLAVE, APPRAISING THE COMPLIMENT).  I bought you for your skill, not for your life.  Marcellas wrote you are a clever steward.  Be clever with your work, not with your tongue.  If you want freedom, you must work for it.  I’ll have no lazy slaves within these walls or on my farms.  You replace a slave who thought himself my equal.  He is now at the arena, competing in the games.  The law decreed he fight for his own life.  If the thief wins, he’ll steal his life from death. (ANTHONY TURNS FROM THE SLAVE TO PICK UP A SCROLL, CONTINUING TO SPEAK MORE TO HIMSELF THAN TO THE SLAVE.) Though death’s inevitable for all of us.

(DITUS BOUNCES IN. SLOWLY FOLLOWED BY MARCUS, SHY OF ANTHONY, WHO STAYS IN THE BACKGROUND)

KALCHUS:  My master said you were a fine scholar.

ANTHONY:  A soldier first, and, since I survived war….  (HE WAVES AT THE TABLE FULL OF SCROLLS) … I’ve time to search for purpose in old age.

DITUS:  Where is Stilus?

ANTHONY:  I sent him away; Stilus was a thief; he is no more.

DITUS:  He was my friend.

ANTHONY:  To you… just… a slave.””  (SPEAKING DELIBERATELY, TO DISCIPLINE DITUS AND TO COMMUNICATE TO KALCHUS WHAT HE EXPECTS OF A SLAVE)  A slave who steals faces circus combat.  

DITUS:  But Stilus…””

ANTHONY:  This is Kalchus, our new steward.””  (TO KALCHUS.)  Meet us in the library below.

(KALCHUS BOWS AND EXITS. DITUS MOVES TO THE BALUSTRADE TO STARE MOODILY AT THE STREET BELOW.)

ANTHONY:  (Acknowledging Marcus) Well, Marcus, are you here to play at more water games from your friend’s roof?

DITUS:  Father, why did you not confer with me?

ANTHONY:  ‘Confer with you!’  About Stilus?  He broke the Roman law and we will honor all the laws of Rome., 

EUODIA: (Enters) Anthony, Rufio is below and asks for you.

ANTHONY:  (Changing his tone to placate his son.)  Is he the one on whom you poured water?  You and Marcus will suspend your pranks while I meet my friend.  And it is time you bathed and changed your garments.  You look like street beggars, not worth wasting water on.

EUODIA:  Fortunately, it was not Rufio on whom they dumped.  The stranger was soaked.  I appeased him with a gift of a meat pie.  Rufio asks to see you here.

ANTHONY:  He knows this is my sanctuary.  The rooftop is where I can be alone without interruption…  (Tousles Ditus’ hair, who draws away, pouting)  … except for pranksters.

EUODIA:  Rufio is upset.  He asks for privacy.

ANTHONY:  Very well.

(EUODIA MOTIONS TO THE BOYS WHO, RELIEVED TO BE DISMISSED, DISAPPEAR DOWN THE STAIRS.  SHE FOLLOWS)

(ANTHONY SHRUGS AT THE INTERRUPTION AND SITS AT THE TABLE, STUDYING A SCROLL.   HE DOES NOT NOTICE A WOMAN RISE FROM THE STAIRWAY IN THE BUILDING ACROSS THE ALLEY AND STAND, WATCHING HIM.  WHEN HE DOES NOT LOOK UP, SHE PICKS UP A BASKET AND DROPS IT.  IT BOUNCES WITH A DULL THUD.  ANTHONY LOOKS UP, RISES, AND NODS).  

LYDIA:  I know this rooftop is your private place away from all the clamor of the world.  Forgive my interruption, but I must….

ANTHONY:  Lydia…?

LYDIA:  You have met my house guest, Paul.

ANTHONY  He is a very interesting man.

LYDIA:  You have heard him speak about his god.

ANTHONY:  Yes.  Euodia prevailed on me to join you at the river.  I have heard.

LYDIA:  And have you believed?

ANTHONY:  His religion’s not for me, and not too practical for Philippi.  I find no harm in what he practices as long as it does not endanger Rome.

LYDIA:  He is a Roman citizen.  He means no harm, only to bring us good.

ANTHONY:  Then what’s the problem.  Why do you come to me?

LYDIA:  He’s been arrested.  He’s in prison now.  Men listen to you  because you are respected.  Although you hold no office, men of law here in Philippi accept your advice.

ANTHONY:  And you would have me mediate for him?

LYDIA:  He would do no harm to any man.

ANTHONY:  His words are very winning.  You and my wife seem convinced his god is the best god.

LYDIA:  The only true god.

ANTHONY:  Careful, Lydia, do not forget, my emperor is a god.

LYDIA:  But Caesar will permit my personal god.

ANTHONY:  As long as he does not endanger Rome.

(A PANTING RUFIO, FOLLOWED BY DITUS, ENTERS, CARRYING A COVERED BASKET, HOLDING IT BEFORE HIS FAT STOMACH AS IF HE HAS A PRICELESS BURDEN.  WHEN HE SEES LYDIA, HE STOPS, FROWNS, AND LOOKED QUESTIONINGLY AT ANTHONY.)

ANTHONY:  I will consider all that you have said and act upon it should I judge it wise.

(LYDIA BOWS AND EXITS STAGE LEFT.)

RUFIO:  Friend Anthony.

ANTHONY:  Comrade Rufio.  I see you are dry.  (THE MEN EMBRACE.  DITUS STAYS A STEP BEHIND RUFIO)

RUFIO:  Dry?  The sun is shining.  There is no rain.

ANTHONY:  Right.  There is no rain.

RUFIO:  I asked Ditus to join us for I bring him a gift to show him how we fought as comrades in arms.

(RUFIO PLACES THE BASKET ON THE TABLE AND WAVES FOR DITUS

TO LIFT THE LID.  IMPATIENTLY RUFIO ASSISTS THE BOY, SMILING   INDULGENTLY.  AS DITUS REMOVES TWO NAVAL VESSELS FROM THE BASKET, RUFIO LOOKS UP AT ANTHONY.)

RUFIO:  These bring back memories.  For your son Ditus.

DITUS:  What beauties, Rufio.  Thank you.

RUFIO:  Anthony, remember how you led the infantry across the corvis from our ship to theirs?  Ditus, place the boarding plank – it’s called a ‘corvis’ – here on the pole which swivels from deck to deck.  Your father led the charge which won the day.  The Lydian merchant brought me this from Rome.  I had it especially made.  Anthony, you are too modest.  Your son needs to know how great his father was leading his men on land and sea.  He’s seen your corona?””

ANTHONY:  Ditus, why not share this with your friend? Show him how the corvus links the ships.

(DITUS QUICKLY PLACES THE TOYS IN THE BASKET AND STARTS OUT; THEN, REMEMBERING HIS MANNERS, HE TURNS, BOWS)

DITUS:  My father’s comrade honors me with these gifts.  (DITUS EXITS CENTER REAR)

RUFIO:  Your son will make a fine centurion.   (LOOKS OUT OVER THE CITY)  You command a great view of Philippi from your roof.  You were very wise to build so high.  Does your neighbor intrude upon your solitude?

ANTHONY:  Seldom.  She respects my privacy.

RUFIO:  It is not right a woman should control a business.  I dislike these foreigners who put on airs.  They forget their place.

ANTHONY:  What is their place?  Remember, we are Romans living in a conquered land.

RUFIO:  The right of conquest.  But a woman merchant!

ANTHONY:  You did not come here to discuss women.

RUFIO:  This Lydia has a house guest, Paul, a Jew.

ANTHONY:  And a Roman citizen.  (RUFIO IS SHOCKED TO HEAR THIS)  So I’m told.

RUFIO:  That is a problem!  A citizen of Rome!

ANTHONY:  What is there about this Paul that troubles you?

RUFIO:  You know of the slave girl with the spirit who has a gift for telling the unknown?

ANTHONY:  I have seen her walking through the streets and know the foolish spend their gold on her.  Has she told your fortune?

RUFIO:  Is it foolish to run ahead of time and know misfortune before it catches you?

ANTHONY:  And know good fortune and guarantee a win?  Rufio, the gods will not reveal the future nor will they give free men or slaves such skill.

RUFIO:  But she has brought gold to businessmen and told them when to sell and when to buy.  But now….  .

ANTHONY:  But now…?

RUFIO:  She’s lost her special gift.  This Paul, this Jew, who talks of a new god….  She followed him, ignoring all, shrieking, ‘These men are slaves of the most high God, offering salvation to all men….”

ANTHONY:  Salvation to all men!  Quite a gift!

RUFIO:  This went on for days.  She would not use her fortune-telling gift, she would not work, there was no profit now in owning her, and finally, this man Paul, annoyed, in the name of his Christ, cast the spirit out of her.  She is useless now.

ANTHONY:  A slave who brings no profit now to you?  She is your slave?

(RUFIO SHRUGS, NOT EAGER TO ADMIT HIS INVOLVEMENT.)

ANTHONY:&a

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